(via The Customer Jobs_To_Be_Done Canvas Prototype | LinkedIn)

(via The Customer Jobs_To_Be_Done Canvas Prototype | LinkedIn)

"The paper investigates the effects that consumer-perceived sender expense and effort might have on brand perceptions. More specifically, it extends the marketing signal literature to advertising by including both sender expense and effort, and by including both positive and negative effects. A quantitative analysis of 4,000 consumers’ perceptions of creativity-award winning, effectiveness-award winning and non-award winning advertisements finds that advertisements with higher-than-average perceived expense and effort have positive impacts on brand attitudes, brand interest and word-of-mouth (WOM), while advertisements with lower-than-average perceived expense have corresponding negative impacts."

Erik Modig – Creative versus efficient advertising

"The statistical explanation of Double Jeopardy is that it is a selection effect. This depends on the fact that brand share depends largely on mental and physical availability, rather than differentiated appeals of different brands. And for marketers this is pretty important, we wouldn’t get Double Jeopardy if brands were highly differentiated appealing to different segments of the market. Since we do see Double Jeopardy all over the place that suggests that real-world differentiation is pretty mild. Mental and physical availability must be a much bigger story than differentiation. That’s a very important insight."

What causes the Double Jeopardy law? | Marketing Science

(Source: youtube.com)

"In 2001, my co-workers at PayPal and I would often get lunch on Castro Street in Mountain View, Calif. We had our pick of restaurants, starting with obvious categories like Indian, sushi and burgers. There were more options once we settled on a type: North Indian or South Indian, cheaper or fancier, and so on. In contrast to the competitive local restaurant market, PayPal was then the only email-based payments company in the world. We employed fewer people than the restaurants on Castro Street did, but our business was much more valuable than all those restaurants combined. Starting a new South Indian restaurant is a really hard way to make money. If you lose sight of competitive reality and focus on trivial differentiating factors—maybe you think your naan is superior because of your great-grandmother’s recipe—your business is unlikely to survive."

Peter Thiel: Competition Is for Losers - WSJ

(via https://twitter.com/avinash/status/513840275853021185/photo/1)

(via https://twitter.com/avinash/status/513840275853021185/photo/1)

(Source: youtube.com)

"I want to finish with an open letter to all brand managers who want their customers to love their brand. Dear ‹insert brand here› We have been together for a while now, and I have really enjoyed our time together. You have fulfilled a need for me and I am grateful for that. But lately I worry that you want more out of this relationship than I am willing to give. You ask me if I love you, if I will forsake all other brands for you. I am just not ready for that, and I am not sure if I will ever be. I like seeing other brands, sometimes just for a change, to satisfy needs when you are not around, for all sorts of reasons. I really don’t want to keep having to explain myself every time you see me with another brand. And while you want me to be exclusive to you, I notice you have been seeing other customers. If you are not faithful to me, how can you expect me to be solely loyal to you? So perhaps it’s better if we part ways; it’s not me, it’s you. There are no hard feelings - I would be happy to vouch for you to others in the future. I have never regretted any of our encounters and, apart from this recent clinginess, you have been a good brand to me. Perhaps when you are ready to have the type of relationship that works for both of us, we can start again. All the best for the future, Your (normal) customer"

Viewpoint: What’s (brand) love got to do with it? | Market Research Society

"Yet arguments rage about how much brands are worth and why. Firms that value them come to starkly different conclusions. Most of the time they do not appear as assets on companies’ balance-sheets (see article). One school of thought says brands succeed mainly by inspiring loyalty. “Consumers would die for Apple,” believes Nick Cooper of Millward Brown. Others take a cooler view. Bruce McColl, who as the chief marketer of Mars oversees Snickers chocolate bars, Whiskas cat food and other brands, is on record as saying that “consumers aren’t out there thinking about our brands.” And however much brands may have been worth in the past, their importance may be fading."

Marketing: What are brands for? | The Economist